The Foundation is pleased to offer our grantees the opportunity to share information about their grant on our website.  We hope it will offer the public increased visibility for your work.

Terms and Conditions. This form is intended for those who have received a Puffin Foundation grant.  By filling out this form, you will be requesting Puffin to post information about your granted project on our web site.  Please fill out the form carefully.  It includes the option to provide an email address for the public to contact you, as well as providing an email address for the Foundation to use internally that would not be made public.  Note that if you include personally identifiable information in your public content, it can be used and viewed by others.   We are not responsible for the information you choose to include in public content.  The Foundation reserves the right to edit any submissions for size and appropriate content.  If you wish to give photo, audio or video credit for submissions, such credit should be included in your text under the description of your project.

An exhibition exploring Martin Luther King Jr.’s connection to NYC opens this weekend
Visit the Museum of the City of New York Full Article on Timeout.com ... more
Colin Kaepernick is the winner of the 2017 Puffin/Nation Prize for Creative Citizenship
Puffin Foundation President Perry Rosenstein, Executive Director Gladys Miller-Rosenstein, Vice President Neal... more
Major New Work Arriving Soon at the Puffin Sculpture Garden
Recent visitors to Puffin have been asking about the excavation site in... more
Foundation News & Blog
Honoring the Memory of Newtown Victims
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One year later- Come Honor the Memory of the Victims of the Newtown Massacre

held by the Bergen County Coalition to Prevent Gun Violence

Help to remember the 20 children and 6 adults who lost their lives at Sandy Hook Elementary School
Saturday December 14th at 5:30pm
Teaneck Town Green (Corner of Cedar Ln. & Teaneck Rd.)


Among those sharing words of remembrance:
New Jersey State Senator Loretta Weinberg
Rabbi Steven Sitbu of Teaneck's Temple Emeth

Please bring flashlights rather than actual candles

 
Climate Change Spells Peril for Puffins
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Red full article at:http://blog.nwf.org/

With its distinctive appearance, the Atlantic puffin has been endowed with colorful names—from “sea parrot” to “the clown of the sea,” and even “sea rooster.” Nicknames aside, these tuxedoed waddlers are causing increased concern and sounding a now all-too-familiar alarm from the natural world about the growing consequences of climate change.

The puffin is a robust little bird with sad-looking triangular eyes of a crying clown matched with its large triangular beak (which changes from gray to bright orange in breeding season) and its slick-backed cranial feathers that give it a don-like hairdo. Needless to say, this bird’s quite the looker and has become a fan favorite. The Atlantic puffin can do it all: they are excellent swimmers, sleek flyers, skilled hunters and whimsical waddlers. Even their name is endearing.

Puffins Face Dramatic Decline


However, for the cute little round-bodied bird that has captured the affection of so many admirers, times are tough and their lives are increasingly perilous. A recent article by the Associated Press announced that puffin populations have seen a dramatic decline in the United States and other parts of the world as sea temperatures continue to rise.

Scientists have recorded declining survival rates for puffin fledglings (as if they weren’t cute enough, baby puffins have an equally adorable title—they’re called pufflings!) in Maine’s two largest colonies. Furthermore, the largest puffin colony in the Gulf of Maine, which lies just 10 miles off the coast, has suffered increased health degradation amongst adult puffins. Emaciated birds have washed ashore by the dozens from Massachusetts to Bermuda and could signal a worsening future for the bird as well as other migratory birds facing similar challenges spurred by climate change.

Like the many migratory birds that have had to literally shift their way of life, the puffin is finding it more difficult to find its major food sources as fish populations are displaced as ocean temperatures warm, causing mismatches in prey-and-predator relationships and shortages in the abundance of herring, their primary food staple. A marked deficit of roughly 5% annually has been recorded in the presence of herring in the diets of puffin populations. Many puffin populations are filling the void by hunting and feeding their young butterfish, which are now more abundant in the area as they too react to changing conditions. But, young puffins are simply unable to swallow these larger fish and many have died of starvation.

Low birth rates, high fledgling mortality, food supply disruption coupled with recent unprecedented die-offs, delayed breeding seasons, and rapid habitat destruction caused by more frequent and extreme ocean conditions could prove crippling for puffins and many more of our feathered friends.

Migratory Birds at Risk from Climate Change


A new report by the National Wildlife Federation details the effects rapidly changing climate is having on migratory birds across the country. Shifting Skies: Confronting the Climate Crisis, goes into greater detail on the potential damage climate change can have on critical migratory bird habitat, their main food resources, and the timing and direction of their migration patterns. Puffins are not the only birds in peril.

  • Birds’ ranges are shifting and in some cases, contracting. 177 of 305 species tracked have shifted their centers of abundance during the winter northward by 35 miles on average in the past four decades.
  • Coastal wetlands and beach habitats, home to birds like king rails and piping plovers, are disappearing, inundated by sea level rise.
  • Global warming is exacerbating pests and disease, such as mountain pine beetle epidemics that have devastated many western forests resulting in mass losses of key habitat.
  • Changing precipitation patterns threaten the Midwest’s prairie pothole region, known as “America’s duck factory.” Many ducks such as mallards and pintails face disappearing breeding habitat.
  • To learn more about how the climate crisis is affecting our nation’s migratory bird populations, check out the full report at www.nwf.org/BirdsAndClimate.

     
    Jeremy Scahill discussed his book Dirty Wars at Puffin
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    On Monday November 18th, Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow at the Nation Institute and award-winning investigative journalist Jeremy Scahill presented his latest book, Dirty Wars: The World is a Battlefield. The book debuted at #5 on the New York Times Best Sellers List, his previous book Blackwater made the list in 2007. The discussion, presented to a full house, was led by Dr. Joseph Chuman, leader of the Bergen County Ethical Culture Society. Clips were screened from the accompanying documentary Dirty Wars, which won the Best Cinematography Award for a US Documentary at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival. You can pick up a copy of Jeremy's books online or at your local bookstore, they are well worth your time.

    Jeremy Scahill and Dr. Chuman

     

     
    The Bergen Museum of Art & Science presents an exhibit of the Rock 'n' Roll Photography of Alan Rand
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    The exhibit is at the Bergen Performing Arts Center located at 30 North Van Brunt Street, Englewood, NJ 07631. Reception is Tuesday, October 8, from 5 to 8 PM and will include music, live entertainment and refreshments. The exhibit is featured at the Intermezzo Gallery of Bergen PAC and will run from Oct 2nd to Oct 30th, The Gallery is open to the general public Monday through Friday, 11:00 AM to 4:00 PM and Saturday 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM.

    The exhibit is free however the Bergen Museum of Art & Science is accepting donations to help fund the event.

    Donations can be made here on the museum's page for the show thebergenmuseum.com

     
    Happy New Year
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    Happy New Year to our Jewish Friends & Neighbors. Our best wishes for Peace, Health, and Happiness in the year 5774.

    -The Puffin Foundation, Ltd.

     
    A Letter from the Museum of the City of NY to The Puffin Foundation, Ltd.
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    MCNY 1220 Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street
    mcny.org

    Dear Gladys and Perry,

    On behalf of the Board of Trustees and staff of the Museum of the City of New York, I most heartily thank you for the Puffin Foundation's gifts and your generous pledge for the Puffin Foundation Gallery endowment. You have been so extraordinarily generous to this institution, and I am tremendously grateful for your visionary support of the gallery, which has contributed so greatly to the Museum's mission and service to the public.

    From professional development workshops for NYC teachers, to field trips serving tens of thousands of public school children each year, to gallery talks and public programs, the Puffin Foundation Gallery is a vital center, illuminating an aspect of the city's history that is key to its identity. The Foundation's generous gifts toward an endowment ensure that the gallery will continue to educate New Yorkers and visitors from across the globe for generations to come.

    Sincerely,
    Susan Henshaw Jones
    Ronay Menschel Director


    Activist New York is the inaugural exhibition in The Puffin Foundation Gallery, which is dedicated to the ways in which ordinary New Yorkers have exercised their power to shape the city's and the nation's future.

    Activist New York explores the drama of social activism in New York City from the 17th century right up to the present. In a town renowned for its in-your-face persona, citizens of the city have banded together on issues as diverse as historic preservation, civil rights, wages, sexual orientation, and religious freedom. Using artifacts, photographs, audio and visual presentations, as well as interactive components that seek to tell the entire story of activism in the five boroughs, Activist New York presents the passions and conflicts that underlie the city's history of agitation.

     
    Puffin Foundation provides support for Camp K, local children
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    Article from the Teaneck Suburbanite 7/11/2013

     

     
    Teaneck Suburbanite: Opinion Letter on Teaneck Red Oak
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    Thursday, July 11, 2013
    Teaneck Suburbanite

    Sad day

    To the editor,

    It was a sad day in Teaneck when those who have been clamoring for the destruction of the majestic red oak on Cedar Lane finally got their wish. This tree - centuries old - was here before any of us, and before there was a town, or even a nation. It survived countless adversities including the American Revolution, the Teaneck riots, and every storm that has been thrown at it for some 300 years but it could not survive human folly.

    Instead of caring for this natural wonder in our midst, we remove nearly half of its roots during a construction project... and then later learn that it isn't doing so well, and has to come down. Besides, we say, it stands in the way of high property values and development. Now that this beautiful tree is out of the way of "progress," we get treated to a letter from the landowner in the Teaneck Suburbanite, in which he practically gloats over finally getting his wish to have it destroyed, and proclaims his hope that those who defended the "nearly dead" tree will suffer from guilty consciences -- for making him wait! Wow.

    Our stately trees are under attack all across this self-described "Tree City, USA." Just about all sizable trees of any species have come thudding down near our home since we moved here 10 years ago. Just last week, one of the few remaining ones - a healthy maple with no rot whatsoever - was cut down across the corner. A neighbor was jubilant. I asked why. "It had to go... it was lifting the sidewalk!" he proclaimed.

    So I guess even the small ones have to go. Heaven forbid we should redo the sidewalk to account for a tree... no, every tree of any size might damage a sidewalk, every tree could possibly fall and hurt someone, or drop a limb that might damage property. So, we better take them all down, right? And now the town has approved a new bill that will make it easier for residents to do just that, without having to wait for the town to evaluate its trees. They can do it themselves by hiring their own "tree experts" -- probably the very ones who stand to profit from the removal of trees.

    I fear that humans are in for a shock... that sooner or later it will become terribly clear that we can not just have endless growth, endless development, endless destruction, and expect everything to be fine.

    Scott Robinson

    - See more at:
    http://www.northjersey.com/news/opinions/215021381_Teaneck_letters__July_11.html#sthash.rR6Qg15j.dpuf

     
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