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Younger Americans are getting a bad deal. How?
Read all about it in this NY Times article by Astra Taylor. ... more
Another Great Review of the Puffin-Supported Exhibit City of Workers at the Museum of the City of New York
The exhibition City of Workers, City of Struggle: How Labor Movements Changed... more
Puffin is proud to support the Economic Hardship Reporting Project
The voices of the poor, marginalized and financially struggling are rarely heard... more
The Puffin Foundation is the proud sponsor of "City of Workers, City of Struggle"
  
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The exhibit is a fascinating look at the vital and important history of labor movements in the City of New York. It opens on May 1st at the Museum of the City of New York.


Explore the fascinating history of labor in New York City.

For some two centuries, working people’s movements have shaped New York—and vice versa. Some of the first labor organizations in the country were formed by the city’s artisans in the early 19th century, and some of the nation’s foremost labor leaders have been New Yorkers, from Samuel Gompers and Elizabeth Gurley Flynn to A. Philip Randolph and Sidney Hillman.

But working New Yorkers have also struggled with each other over pay, power, and inclusion. New waves of workers—women, immigrants, people of color, and the “unskilled”—have repeatedly defined their own movements for a better life, and in the process remade city life in ways that affect all. City of Workers, City of Struggle: How Labor Movements Changed New York traces the social, political, and economic story of these diverse workers and their movements in New York through rare documents, artifacts, and footage, and considers the future of labor in the city.