Grantee tags portraits

The Oasis Art Gallery

The American Friends of Neve Shalom/Wahat al Salam

Year Grant Awarded: 2019

The Oasis Art Gallery, located in the bilingual, binational, multicultural village of Neve Shalom/Wahat al Salaam, brings Israeli Palestinian and Jewish artists together for in-person workshops and joint art exhibits. Read More

Counterpoint Project

Patrick Earl Hammie

Year Grant Awarded: 2017

This project is a co-creation with Patrick Earl Hammie and dancer and choreographer Endalyn Taylor that explores, discusses, and reframes the ongoing cultural and critical contributions of black ballerinas in dance and visual culture. Read More

Portraits of the Ecological Self

Callas, Kimberly

Year Grant Awarded: 2013

Is there an ecological self? Is there a place within us that remembers we are nature? Can this ‘self’ hold the answers about how to live sustainably within the cycles and limits of our home planet? I explore these questions through this art project. Read More

Window Studio

Year Grant Awarded: 2013

The Window Studio project takes a participatory approach to traditional portraiture to create a collaborative portrait of the neighborhood of Bedford Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. Read More

First Comes Love

Proud, B.

Year Grant Awarded: 2012

First Comes Love is a celebration of long-term relationships in the LGBTQ community through black and white photographic portraits with accompanying stories, and video. The hardbound book published by Soleil Press will be available in September 2014. Read More

Mary DeWitt: Women Lifers training Canine Partners for Life

DeWitt, Mary

Year Grant Awarded: 2011

I paint the portraits and record the voices of a select group of life-sentenced women. Several women now train puppies for the disabled in the program Canine Partners for Life. I pair their voices describing this with the development of my portraits. Read More

[hyphen] Americans

Anderson-Staley, Keliy

Year Grant Awarded: 2010

This series of over 500 collodion tintypes portraits draws attention to the fact that images of ourselves exist within a history of images, and challenges photography's historical role in defining human difference. Read More

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